MORE WORLD NEWS

Qatar, Saudi rulers meet on Gaza cease-fire talks
Puerto Rico police probe deaths of 16 cats, dogs
Mexico's circuses caught up in animal rights spat
At least 21 dead in Iraq checkpoint car bombing
Israel tells airlines not to cancel flights
Nigerian president meets with parents of abducted girls
Crash scene still not secure
Teen mother of newborn buried in NC yard arrested
Racehorse owned by Britain's queen fails dope test
Canada deports members of human trafficking ring
Freida Pinto speaks at girls' rights summit in UK
European agency urges airlines to avoid Tel Aviv
Egypt: 20 'terrorists' carried out border attack
Infighting as split emerges among Syrian rebels
Italy arrests smugglers accused of killing dozens
Minibus crash in France kills 5 children, 1 adult
Turkish PM says he, Obama no longer talk directly
C. African Republic talks on hold; rebels absent
Assailants attack Congo military camp in capital
Polish leader wants NATO to beef up eastern flank
UN chief believes Gaza fighting will end soon
British experts to analyze MH17 black boxes
Report finds Islamic plot to control UK schools
Kerry: Cease-fire won't be enough
Thailand's junta adopts interim constitution
German court: chronically ill could grow marijuana
Putin: Russia will facilitate plane investigation
China's typhoon toll rises to 46 dead, 25 missing
Saudi stock market to allow foreign investment
China ex-officials see reprisals for baring abuses



World News
News from the region's first prime-time newscast. You'll find it First On Fox!


VATICAN-5 THINGS TO KNOW-THE CEREMONY
2 living popes to honor 2 dead ones in canonization of John XXIII and John Paul II

Reported by: Associated Press
Reported: Saturday, April 26, 2014 8:19 AM EDT
VATICAN CITY


In a historic match-up of papacies past and present, Pope Francis and emeritus Pope Benedict XVI will honor Popes John XXIII and John Paul II in the first ever canonization of two popes. For such a momentous occasion, the ceremony is actually quite short and surprisingly straightforward, with the added benefit that the relics of the two new saints will be presented for universal veneration by the church for the first time. Here are five things to look for — though beware, the rite is celebrated mostly in Latin, the official language of the Catholic Church.

1. THE CEREMONY

The preliminary part of the ceremony begins at around 0700 GMT with prayers, hymns and culminates with the chanting of the hypnotic Litany of Saints, the roll call of the church's saints, each one followed by the refrain "Ora pro nobis," or "Pray for us."

After Pope Francis and concelebrants process to the altar, the canonization rite begins immediately.

The head of the Vatican's saint-making office, Cardinal Angelo Amato, asks the pope three separate times to include John XXIII and John Paul II among the saints. In the rite for beatification, there is only one such petition. The three repeated requests for canonization "signify the importance of this celebration," noted the Vatican spokesman the Rev. Federico Lombardi.

2. THE PRONOUNCEMENT

Pope Francis then says: "For the honor of the Blessed Trinity, the exaltation of the Catholic faith and the increase of the Christian life, by the authority of our Lord Jesus Christ, and of the holy Apostles Peter and Paul, and our own, after due deliberation and frequent prayer for divine assistance, and having sought the counsel of many of our brother bishops, we declare and define Blessed John XXIII and John Paul II be saints and we enroll them among the saints, decreeing that they are to be venerated as such by the whole church. In the name of the Holy Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit."

3. THE RELICS

Relics of the two new saints are then brought to the altar. In the case of John Paul, the same relic — his blood — used for his 2011 beatification is being used. For John XXIII, a small piece of skin taken after his body was exhumed for his 2000 beatification is being used. Relics — the physical remains of a new saint or things he or she touched in life — are used to help the faithful venerate.

Amato then thanks Francis and asks him to draw up an official document attesting to the canonization. Francis responds "We so decree" and the rite ends with the singing of the "Gloria."

The Mass then proceeds as usual.

4. BY THE NUMBERS

—The Vatican said Saturday that Francis would preside over the Mass and Benedict would concelebrate along with 150 cardinals and 700 bishops. It's the first time Benedict has joined Francis in celebrating Mass in public since his resignation in 2013. Benedict attended the February ceremony in St. Peter's Basilica in which Francis installed 19 new cardinals, but as a spectator.

—About 600 priests will distribute Communion in St. Peter's Square and 210 deacons will distribute Communion to the throngs of people expected to line up along Via della Conciliazione, the main boulevard leading away from the square.

—93 official delegations attending, including an estimated 24 heads of state. The kings and queens of Belgium and Spain are expected, as are royals from Andorra, Britain and Luxemburg. Poland is sending one of the largest delegations with the current president and two former presidents, including Lech Walesa, founder of the Solidarity movement that toppled communism in Poland, which John Paul supported.

—20 Jewish leaders from the U.S., Israel, Argentina, Poland and Rome.

5. VIRTUAL CANONIZATION

—Official website www.2popesaints.org with information also available at www.vatican.va

—Vatican liturgical booklet with step-by-step process of canonization rite and order of Mass at http://www.vatican.va/news_services/liturgy/libretti/2014/20140427-libretto-canonizzazione.pdf

—Official hashtag #2popesaints

Follow Nicole Winfield at www.twitter.com/nwinfield










PRIME PICKS

FAMILY GUY
Tonight at 8:00 PM

Herpe, the Love Sore
Stewie gets an STD from Brian; Peter and the guys fight for their booth at The Drunken Clam



Get 1/2 price gift certificates

Find us on Facebook

Advertisement