MORE WORLD NEWS

South Africa: Rhino poacher gets 77 years in jail
Thai junta defends strong powers under new charter
Shipwrecked Concordia on verge of final voyage
Australia: All Ukraine victims may not be found
Iraq: Death toll from Baghdad attack rises to 31
John Kerry files to Tel Aviv despite FAA ban
Ex-general to challenge Indonesian election defeat
Bodies of Malaysia jet victims to leave Ukraine
Gaza families plead for evacuation amid battle
Australia focuses on both Malaysian jet disasters
Parts of Chinese city sealed for bubonic plague
China cracks down on online rumors, porn
Qatar, Saudi rulers meet on Gaza cease-fire talks
Puerto Rico police probe deaths of 16 cats, dogs
Mexico's circuses caught up in animal rights spat
At least 21 dead in Iraq checkpoint car bombing
Israel tells airlines not to cancel flights
Nigerian president meets with parents of abducted girls
Crash scene still not secure
Teen mother of newborn buried in NC yard arrested
Racehorse owned by Britain's queen fails dope test
Canada deports members of human trafficking ring
Freida Pinto speaks at girls' rights summit in UK
European agency urges airlines to avoid Tel Aviv
Egypt: 20 'terrorists' carried out border attack
Infighting as split emerges among Syrian rebels
Italy arrests smugglers accused of killing dozens
Minibus crash in France kills 5 children, 1 adult
Turkish PM says he, Obama no longer talk directly
C. African Republic talks on hold; rebels absent



World News
News from the region's first prime-time newscast. You'll find it First On Fox!


GERMANY-SAMSUNG-SECURITY
American researcher says he's fooled fingerprint check on Samsung's flagship Galaxy S5

Reported by: Associated Press
Reported: Thursday, April 17, 2014 8:47 AM EDT
BERLIN


A Berlin-based researcher says he has managed to fool the fingerprint-based security system on Samsung's new Galaxy S5 smartphone using wood glue and a picture of the original print.

Ben Schlabs, an American who works for German firm Security Research Labs GmbH, says the trick is identical to the one hackers used to unlock Apple's iPhone 5 last year.

The flaw is potentially more serious than in the iPhone, because Schlabs says he was also able to trick the electronic payment app PayPal that uses Samsung's authentication system into accepting the fake fingerprint.

Schlabs says users concerned about security can choose to use a strong password instead of the convenient but flawed fingerprint system.

A spokeswoman for Samsung in Germany wasn't immediately able to comment on the issue Thursday.










PRIME PICKS

THE BIG BANG THEORY
Tonight at 7:30 PM

The Work Song Nanocluster
Penny's home business turns into a complete nightmare when Sheldon takes over



Get 1/2 price gift certificates

Find us on Facebook

Advertisement