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Kentucky News
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ASH BORER-TREES
Ash borer blamed for wiping out ash trees in Kentucky

Reported by: Associated Press
Reported: Friday, July 11, 2014 10:12 AM EDT
LOUISVILLE, Ky.


An infestation of small green beetles has started to take a toll on ash trees in Kentucky.

The Courier-Journal reports that from Lexington to Louisville and north to Cincinnati, ash trees are being wiped out from rural landscapes, parks, subdivisions and urban corridors.

The culprit is the emerald ash borer.

The Asian invader arrived in Kentucky a few years ago from the north where the beetles killed more than 25 million trees.

Jody Thompson, ecologist and forest health specialist with the Kentucky Division of Forestry, says it's the start of a peak decline for the trees in some areas of the state.

Experts like Thompson are worried about property damage and injuries from falling limbs or trees.

Information from: The Courier-Journal, http://www.courier-journal.com










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